1969 Gibson EB-1 bass.

1969 Gibson EB-1 bass.

Here is a fairly simple repair to a fairly common problem with vintage Gibson basses with two point bridges (three point bridges as well). This 1969 Gibson EB-1 "violin bass" has a classic problem of the silk string windings crossing over the saddles and robbing sustain.

The photo below shows the bass as it came into the shop. The player had unraveled portions of the silk windings to try and remedy the problem, notably on the E and A strings.

The silks of the string windings end up on the saddles when properly intonated and rob sustain.

The silks of the string windings end up on the saddles when properly intonated and rob sustain.

Another issue with this bass was that the pickup was physically loose and rattling. This was a simple fix as the cover was removed and another layer of foam was fitted underneath the pickup. The foam supports the pickup while the cover holds it in place. A quick and dirty repair.

The infamous Gibson “mudbucker”. This pickup was rattling inside the cover, so foam was added underneath to make up for the compressed original foam.

The infamous Gibson “mudbucker”. This pickup was rattling inside the cover, so foam was added underneath to make up for the compressed original foam.

So, back to the saddle issues. My customer turned me onto the Webbteca MOD-BAR, which is made by Evan Webb in Columbus, OH. This simple yet genius bar installs without modifying the original bridge and spaces the string balls back enough for the silks to clear the saddles.

The bar resting on top of the original bridge is the Webbteca MOD-BAR. This simple stainless steel bar spaces the strings back enough for the saddles to clear the silks. Note the bar needed to be further relieved so the bridge saddle adjustments would clear the bar.

The bar resting on top of the original bridge is the Webbteca MOD-BAR. This simple stainless steel bar spaces the strings back enough for the saddles to clear the silks. Note the bar needed to be further relieved so the bridge saddle adjustments would clear the bar.

The only modification required was to relieve the MOD-BAR so that it would clear the saddle intonation adjustment screws in the rear of the bridge. The photo below shows those saddle adjustment screws, just below the string ball ends.

Just below the string ball ends is the saddle intonation adjustments.

Just below the string ball ends is the saddle intonation adjustments.

The bar is held on by string tension alone and now the saddles have plenty of room for intonation. With the silks not coming in contact with the saddles, the strings are able to vibrate free and ring true. Very slick solution Evan!

The bridge with the MOD-BAR installed. No modifications to the original bridge are required and the bar is held on by string tension alone. Very slick!

The bridge with the MOD-BAR installed. No modifications to the original bridge are required and the bar is held on by string tension alone. Very slick!

The bass now plays better than ever. And for you crazy collectors that value originality over playability, this bass can easily be brought back to stock by removing the MOD-BAR. (note the chrome bridge cover and pick guard could be added as well.)

Bassists / guitar tech's looking for a MOD-BAR, here is some contact info. Evan is a great guy and loves to talk shop.

Evan Webb

(614) 716-9750

eBay Store

1969 Gibson EB-1 with Webbteca MOD-BAR installed in the bridge, strings ringing true.

1969 Gibson EB-1 with Webbteca MOD-BAR installed in the bridge, strings ringing true.

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